Poems For The Dance by Scott Thurston (Aquifer)

This is an exceptional post by Ian Brinton in Tears in the fence´s blog today. Being an avid William Carlos William reader, I feel the need to keep it here.

Tears in the Fence

In 1923 a Doctor in Rutherford was firmly convinced that much depended upon a red wheelbarrow which sat “glazed with rain / water // beside the white / chickens”. Wallace Stevens referred to that wheelbarrow as a “mobile-like arrangement” and Hugh Kenner suggested that the words hung together dangling in “equidependency, attracting the attention, isolating it, so that the sentence in which they are arrayed comes to seem like a suspension system.” Seven years after the placing of that same wheelbarrow William Carlos Williams went on to weave in words a picture of a cat which “climbed over / the top of // the jamcloset”. The 27 words of the cat’s movements are described in what Kenner called “one sinuous suspended sentence, feeling its way and never fumbling.” In The Pound Era Kenner went on to present us with a surfer:

“The surfer planes obliquely down a hill that renews…

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In his poem ‘Little Haven’ Graham Hartill asks a serious question: ‘Where does the poem end?

As usual Tears in the Fence enlightens readers with the best literature.

Slipping the Leash Graham Hartill, Phil Maillard & Chris Torrance Aquifer

by tearsinthefence.

In his poem ‘Little Haven’ Graham Hartill asks a serious question: ‘Where does the poem end? Where are its outsides in terms of the fields that stutter away to the silent swollen river bouncing alo…

Source: Slipping the Leash Graham Hartill, Phil Maillard & Chris Torrance Aquifer

London Grip´s new Autumn issue includes poem by María C. Dominguez

The new issue of London Grip features new poems by:* Sonja Key * María Castro Domínguez * Fiona Sinclair * Sarah Lawson * Angela Kirby * Phil Wood * Jeni Curtis * J D DeHart * Marc Carver * Hugh McMillan * Linda Rose Parkes * Kate Noakes* Norbert Hirschhorn * Peter Ulric Kennedy * Pam Job * Shash Trevett * Neil Fulwood* Ben Banyard * Fraser Sutherland * Richie McCaffery * Ian C Smith * Jan Hutchinson* Edmund Caterpillar * Charles Tarlton.

A big thanks to Michael Bartholomew-Biggs, London Grip’s current Poetry Editor for having put together such a exciting issue. Quoting from the magazine: LondonGrip is an international online cultural magazine- founded by Patricia Morris in 2007 – is a wholly independent online venue, a cultural omnibus providing intelligent reviews of current shows and events, well-argued articles on the widest range of topics, an exhibition space for cross-media arts and an in-house poetry magazine with its own editor.

Ascension and Abroad aboard by María Castro Domínguez

Friday Flash Fiction, @fridayflashfict, showcases a particular brand of flash fiction. Makes for an exciting read.

Its New contributors are:
Adam J. Rickman
Jane Hertenstein
Debarun Sarkar
Mark Beddard
Erin Armstrong
María Castro Domínguez
Robert Evenstell
Bethany van Sterling
Khulya Jafarova
Pat St Pierre
Mickey Kulp

Here´s a taster of Ascension and Abroad aboard

Ascension

The sky thickened rapidly, the ship now was indistinguishable from the sea. Only flashes of lightening revealed the scrolls soaring, monstrous giants waiting for their feed. The Captain’s eyes said it all. Death was hunting.

“Get off” he boomed pointing to the only lifeboat on board. My mind stopped, then my body took over. The chains lashed at me whilst I loosed the wood delivering it below. I dived in, finding myself under the roof of a greedy wave……….

Abroad aboard

After twenty minutes going up and down, side-stepping cargo cranes and nearly falling into a hold being stowed, I found the bridge.

Hesitating before going in, I had to find my bearings. Persuade myself that I could pull it through…….

Apogee Magazine exploding with art today.

Apogee Magazine is ART.

Today I received my contributor´s copies and I can´t stop looking, reading and touching it.

Apogee 2 (3)

Each page is evocative, stirring, stunning and combines art with poetry, lyrics and fiction. And Jane Callahan and Susan MacRae´s fascinating art accompanies us throughout.

Editor Dr. Charmaine Cadeau and the rest of the editorial team have crafted a beautiful composite gallery of contemporary creation. Apogee radiates a passion for real deep change accomplished by uniting an inspiring mix of eclectic voices. Their mission as they say is to effectuate change in readers’ attitudes, change in writers’ positions in literature, and broader change in society. I can assure you that reading Apogee is quite a mind-changing experience.

Apogee contributors (3)

Six poets are featured in this is issue together with me and my poem Rewriting the End. Among them is one of my favourites, Matt Dugan with his striking alliterative poem City of Glass. Matt Duggan was the winner of The Erbacce Prize for poetry 2015.

Quoting from their page: Apogee is a journal of literature and art that engages with identity politics, including but not limited to: race, gender, sexuality, class, ability, and intersectional identities. We are a biannual print publication featuring fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and visual art.

Apogee Journal is featured in:
NewPages – Issue 06
Ploughshares
The Hairpin
Writer’s Relief
The Review Review
Poets & Writers
The Poetry Foundation
Book Culture Blog
The Catapault
Slice Magazine
New Pages
Brokelyn’s list of independent local magazines

You can find print copies of the latest issue of Apogee at the following bookstores and online:
Bureau of General Services—Queer Division
208 W 13th St #210, New York, NY 10011
(646) 457-0859

Bluestockings
172 Allen St, New York, NY 10002
(212) 777-6028

Book Court
163 Court St, Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 875-3677

Book Culture
536 W 112th St, New York, NY 10025
(212) 865-1588

Greenlight Bookstore
686 Fulton St, Brooklyn, NY 11217
(718) 246-0200

McNally Jackson
52 Prince St, New York, NY 10012
(212) 274-1160

Dystopia by Matt Duggan. Worthy winner of the erbacce-prize.

Dystopia 38.10 comprises a balanced innovative collection of ground-breaking poetry. It is a poetic  dystopia divided into four zones, city life, private life, the life of things, and inner life all blended together. The poetic voice like all good art provokes defamiliarization or ostranenie with a multitude of poetic devices, such as alliteration, repetition, half-rhymes, and enjambments. Also it has something of the confessional poetic strand that Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath propagated. It awakens us from a comatose and complacent state and thrusts us out of the cement of our comfort zone, right from first line. Continue reading

Island Ramble by María C. Domínguez in StepAway Magazine

 

StepAway Magazine Issue 20 is now online with a fantastic collection of poetry, flash fiction and short story.

StepAway Magazine is an award-winning online literary magazine which publishes the best urban flash fiction and poetry by writers from across the globe. The title of the magazine draws inspiration from Frank O’ Hara’s landmark flâneur poem, “A Step Away from Them”.

The Editor Darren Richard Carlaw says it all in his “A letter from the Editor”. As follows I will quote some of his lines:

In the opening to my first editorial on March 21st 2011, I posed the question: ‘who was the first writer to bring a city to life for you?’ I then discussed Blake’s ‘London’ and how, for me, the poem forged a connection between the urban present and the past, capturing that fear and fascination I experienced when walking in the city as a young boy.

I then namedropped Baudelaire, Benjamin and Poe, flâneurs all, before moving on to twentieth century literary wanderers, such as Frank O’Hara, whose New York walking poem ‘A Step Away from Them’ inspired the title and content of this magazine. ‘This is where StepAway Magazine begins,’ I announced hopefully…..

The past five years have flown, and we’ve achieved a great deal. We’ve won a Walking Visionaries Award, which was presented to us in Vienna. We’ve worked with Durham University’s Hearing the Voice Project to create Voicewalks, a creative exploration of inner speech within the context of walking in the city. We’ve celebrated the streets of Fitzrovia with the University of Westminster. We’ve been part of Newcastle’s Festival of Belonging, thanks to Newcastle Centre for the Literary Arts and Trashed Organ. And let’s not forget the publication of twenty issues showcasing the work of well over one hundred and fifty new and established writers…..

Issue 20 also provides a worthy home for the work of a startlingly talented set of writers, including:

Caroline Boobis, María Castro Domínguez, Sally Long, Ilona Martonfi, Luke Otley, Sue Spiers, Nicole Taylor and Norma Wilow.

StepAway Magazine is a Newcastle upon Tyne based online English literary journal. It was founded by the British writer, researcher and literary reviewer, Darren Richard Carlaw.

Key contributors have included James Robison, Sarah Schulman, Lemn Sissay, Maryam Sullivan, Van G. Garrett, and Richard Thomas.

The magazine’s cover art has featured the work of Life magazine photographer Roger Minick, and British artist Paul Baines.

Poem “Riddle me this” by María C. Domínguez in The Tower Journal today

Quite exciting to be in literary magazine The Tower Journal alongside  Allison Joseph with my poem “Riddle me this”. Editor Mary Ann Sullivan does indeed a fine work of art.

Here´s some biographical details of both Mary Ann Sullivan and Allison Joseph.

Mary Ann Sullivan is the author of the middle grade book, Child of War (Holiday House, 1984), which was named a Notable Book in Social Studies by the National Council of Social Studies and Children’s Book Council; a collection of poems, Hermit Day, and numerous digital poems such as “St. Damien of Molokai” and “Shaking the Spiders Out.”An e-collection of poems she wrote when she was a cloistered nun, Mending My Black Sweater (Eratio, 2008) can be found at eratio.

The New York Times called her book, Child of War, set in Belfast, Northern Ireland an “earnest first novel.”

A former cloistered nun, Mary today teaches undergrads writing at  St. Joseph School of Nursing and Great Bay Community College.  She also teaches Fundamentals of Fiction and Fiction Thesis courses for the MA in Creative Writing Program at Southern New Hampshire University.She has a Master of Fine Arts degree from Norwich University and a Doctor of Arts degreefrom Franklin Pierce University.

Her work has appeared at BBC Arts Online, BlazeVox, French Literary Review, Jacket,Mezzo Cammin, National Catholic Register, Poetry Library, Synchronized Chaos and beyond. She has lectured at the New England Conservatory and American Association of University Professors Conference, and is founding editor of Tower Journal, an international online literary journal.

Allison Joseph is the author of six collections of poetry, includingImitation of Life and My Father’s Kites. She is also well known as an editor of the Crab Orchard Review, which she has edited with her husband Jon Tribble since 1995. Through the Crab Orchard Series in Poetry, she and Tribble nurture to publication two outstanding volumes of poetry each year.

Joseph has directed the creative writing program of Southern Illinois University Carbondale, where as an associate professor she continues to be a mentor to countless students. She is the founder and director of the Young Writers Workshop, an annual summer residential creative writing workshop for high school writers. Joseph has previously served on the AWP board of directors. In nominating her for the George Garrett Award, Joseph’s colleagues, Stacey Lynn Brown and Adrian Matejka wrote, “Her continued creative, inventive, and selfless dedication has made the literary world a more beautiful and friendly place, full of possibility and endless opportunity.” Announcing the award at the 2012 AWP Annual Conference & Bookfair, Executive Director David Fenza said, “Allison Joseph is the incarnation of the better angels that animate our organization.”

Alvar Aalto’s masterpiece and Ruben Dario´s Sonatina L6″y en un vaso, olvidada, se desmaya una flor”

Since its unveiling in 1937 at the Paris World’s Fair, the Aalto vase has been an international sensation. Its mysterious shape has been the subject of much speculation; some say it is based on Aalto’s sketches entitled, “The Eskimo Woman’s Leather Breeches.” Others speculate that the fluid shape might be inspired by the lines of the Finnish landscape. Regardless of its questionable origins, one thing remains indisputable: its serene beauty.

But I also can´t help remembering Rubén Darío´s famous Sonatina, verse six, everytime I see a lonely forgotten flower fainting in a vase. So this scene provokes a complex of emotions. And as Ezra Pound asserts referring to the image in poetry, it is “that which presents an intellectual and emotional complex in an instant of time”.

Here you have the first stanza in Spanish, I haven´t included a translation since the English ones so far do not do it justice.

 SONATINA

Rubén Darío (1867-1916)

La princesa está triste… ¿Qué tendrá la princesa?

Los suspiros se escapan de su boca de fresa,

que ha perdido la risa, que ha perdido el color.

La princesa está pálida en su silla de oro,

está mudo el teclado de su clave sonoro,

y en un vaso, olvidada, se desmaya una flor.